Konstantin Tsiolkovsky (1857–1935)

Konstantin Tsiolkovsky (1857–1935)

The collection is dedicated to a prominent representative of Russian cosmism, the founder of theoretical cosmonautics, who first substantiated the possibility of interplanetary communications and the use of missiles for this purpose.

Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky was the first ideologist of active space exploration by man and expressed the idea of ​​creating near-Earth stations as artificial settlements and bases for interplanetary communications. He made a significant contribution to the theory of the motion of missiles and put forward a number of ideas that have found application in rocket engineering, in particular, the gas rudders for controlling the flight of a rocket, the types of fuel and its supply systems. K. E. Tsiolkovsky developed the theory of multistage rockets, first solved the problem of the motion of a rocket in an inhomogeneous gravitational field, considered the effect of the atmosphere on the flight of a rocket, and also calculated the necessary fuel reserves to overcome the forces of resistance of the Earth's air envelope. In 30s he developed the theory of the flight of jet aircraft in the stratosphere and the design of aircraft for flight with hypersonic speeds.

The collection includes publications devoted to the life and work of K. E. Tsiolkovsky, his works on the theory of air and star navigation, rocket science, astronomy, physics, biology, as well as philosophical and sci-fi works.

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