Senate Square in Postcards

Senate Square in Postcards

The Senate Square is one of the oldest in St. Petersburg. It began to take shape in 1704 and at first was just an earth embankment in front of the Admiralty. When the Admiralty lost its defensive function, a part of the earth embankment became a city square. The first official name given to the square in 1738, was associated with St. Isaac's Cathedral, which at the time occupied the place of the monument to Peter I. In 1763, when a government institution, the Senate, moved to the mansion of the Vice-Chancellor Bestuzhev-Ryumin, the square was called the Senate Square. For a short period, from the raising of a monument to Peter I (“The Bronze Horseman”) in 1782 to the early 19th century it changed its name to Peter's Square. With the construction of a new building of the Admiralty (1823) and of the building of Senate and Synod (1829-1834), the architectural ensemble of the square was completed. December 14 (26), 1825 the square became a place of the Decembrist Revolt. In 1923, in memory of this event, the square was renamed to the Decembrists Square. July 31, 2008, due to relocation of the Constitutional Court of the Russian Federation, the historic name, the Senate Square, was restored.

The set of materials includes 44 postcards covering the period from 1946 to 1991.

Originals were provided for digitization by the Children's Museum of Postcards.

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